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What to See in Denmark

 hen Aarhus was named joint European Capital of Culture for 2017, even seasoned travellers had to reach for an atlas. Denmark’s second city has long lived in Copenhagen’s shadow, but its cultural coronation has put a spring in its step, and increasing numbers of visitors have started succumbing to its charms.

One of which is its size. A small, compact city, with a population of just 330,000, Aarhus’s attractions are easily explored on foot or bicycle. They include: ARoS, the contemporary art museum whose rainbow-coloured roof installation can be seen from all over town; the cutting-edge architecture of the revitalised harbour area; the gobsmacking redevelopment of Godsbanen, a goods station turned cultural centre; and the medieval streets of the Latin Quarter. A bike also comes in handy for making the most of the city’s location on the Jutland peninsula. On two wheels, you’re barely 15 minutes from a forest or beach.

Despite its size and provincial mien, Aarhus is a lively place. Students comprise more than 10{05fee30d88f09f95d131a60c2a3e9278426e033ee0bbac6add5583602bf95042} of the population, making it Denmark’s youngest city. And it’s getting younger. Graduates now stick around for work rather than

Hidden Beaches in Thailand

 Haad Farang (Haad Sai Yao), Koh Muk

Framed by jungle-draped limestone karsts, this small but striking bay has serene waters free of riptides, making it safe for families to splash around in the sun. As its nickname implies – farang is Thai for foreigner – you’ll find a large concentration of backpackers here. Still, with only a few sun-loungers and a couple of ramshackle food stops, it’s a far cry from the chaos of Chaweng beach on Koh Samui or Kamala on Phuket. Most of the bungalows, restaurants and Koh Muk’s near-nonexistent nocturnal scene are tucked out of sight in the adjacent woods.

Rent a sea kayak (100 baht, around £2 an hour) and paddle around the corner to Tham Morakot (the Emerald Cave), a winding stalactite-lined cavern that opens up to a sheltered cove walled by dense foliage and frequented by bands of monkeys. It is awe-inspiring, but to fully appreciate it, be sure to pack a torch to avoid slamming into cavern walls and other kayaks. To avoid congestion, make the trip in the late afternoon, after the longtail boats (from £14) carting other travellers disperse.

Perched up on one of the

What to See in Santiago

Santiago has always stood in the shadows of its South American neighbours. It doesn’t have the beaches of Rio or the faded opulence of Buenos Aires, but this modern city of seven million people on the edge of the Andes is beginning to win over global travellers. Airlines are jumping onboard, too: British Airways started the first non-stop flights from the UK last week, with the 14-hour-40-minute journey making it BA’s longest route.

Now, you may never have been to a Chilean restaurant, or even know what Chilean cuisine is, but the food scene is exploding in Santiago. The influential US magazine Saveur has named it the world’s Next Great Food City, and chefs have been toying with indigenous cooking methods and produce found between Patagonia, the Atacama desert and the sea to redefine the nation’s cuisine.

Meanwhile, there are now several wine bars in the Chilean capital – five years ago there were none – giving an important industry here a platform to shine. As the capital of one of South America’s most prosperous and stable nations, Santiago is in the midst of major

Top Honeymoon Destinations

Thailand

The best time to visit Thailand is November through April, which is perfect for all those winter-wedding couples still looking for a beach escape. Stay in Phuket and enjoy romantic sunset dinners, as well as the opportunity to celebrate your new marriage with monks at a simple, private Thai ceremony.  The secluded island of Koh Mook — also known as Pearl Island — offers an authentic cultural experience and the chance to witness Thailand’s natural wonder, Morakot Cave.

Carmel, CA

If you’re a bed and breakfast type of person, you’ll love Carmel. This small coastal town in central California has breezy beaches to relax at during the day, and state of the art cuisine and wine that will satisfy any foodie or wine connoisseur. Staying in this quaint location might be a bit more expensive than cheaper international locations, but staying within the country means cheaper flights!

St. Maarten

Sint Maarten is a Havana look-alike and sits well below the price point of other Caribbean islands. You can zipline, scuba (without needing to be licensed!), take in the tropical wildlife, and hike to Pic Paradis — the most stunning view on the island. Oh,

How to Stay Stylish While Traveling

Dresses

While most of my clothes are solid colors while traveling, I do have one or two colorful dresses and pairs of shoes to brighten up my outfits. For instance, this dress goes with me almost everywhere.

Shoes

Another way to spice up an outfit is by packing a colorful pair of shoes to go with solid colors. These are my favorite travel shoes and I get compliments every single time I wear them — even from men! They go with jeans, shorts, dresses — basically any  solid-colored outfit — and they have an extremely cushioned insole with amazing arch support. I found them at a surf shop in San Diego, but they sell them cheaper on Amazon!

Boots are another great item to liven up an outfit. Not all boots pack well, but I found a cute pair of knee-high boots that don’t take up too much space in my luggage. I normally end up wearing them on the plane, anyway, because they are so comfortable.

Scarves

I’m slightly addicted to buying cute scarves and have a drawer full of them at home. It can be tough to pick just one

Tips on How to Save For Travel

How to Save Money for Travel

1.) Create a Budget: First and foremost, create a spreadsheet in Excel — or another program — and start tracking every single purchase or payment. Do this for about a month or two to get an idea of where your money gets spent. This is a huge eye opener for some people and from here you can consciously decide how you need to change your spending habits.

2.) Selling Items: Go through your closet, garage, and boxes to find items you are no longer using. Then you can either have a garage sale or sell them online at Amazon, Ebay or Craigslist. Selling your unwanted things can boost your savings dramatically.

3.) Stop Buying: It sounds simple, but it takes a great deal of restraint; especially if you are accustomed to buying the newest gadgets or clothes. The next time you want to buy something, ask yourself if you really need it. Most likely the answer is no. When you do need to buy items, try to buy them used, and when something breaks try fixing it first.

4.) Limit Entertainment: Invite friends over instead of

5 best beaches in Portugal

1. Praia de Tavira, Ilha de Tavira (The Algarve)

Linked to the mainland by ferry, the superb Praia de Tavira, is located on the Ilha de Tavira, a sandbar island that stretches southwest from Tavira almost as far as Fuseta.

Strung along this are miles of soft, dune-baked sand, without a hotel in sight. The main part of the beach is dotted with umbrellas and pedalos for rent, and scattered with a handful of bar-restaurants.

In high summer this part of the beach can get very busy, but you only have to wander fifteen minutes or so to escape the crowds. Come here out of season and you’ll probably have the place to yourself.

2. Praia da Marinha and Benagil (The Algarve)

The stretch of coast between Armação de Pêra and Centianes is strung with a series of delightful cove beaches that have mostly escaped large-scale development. Of them two stand out: Praia da Marinha and Benagil. A classic cliff-backed warren of coves, the only trace of development on Praia da Marinha is the seasonal beach restaurant.

Follow the clifftop path on from here as it winds round to the next bay at Benagil,

6 Tips to go China

1. Eat well

Outside of China, impressions of Chinese food are still often defined by the sweet, balanced flavours of Cantonese food. Dim sum and other Cantonese dishes are delicious of course, but there’s a whole world of regional cuisines to discover: the fiery spice ofSichuan and Hunan cuisine; the freshness and sour funkiness of food from Guizhou andYunnan.

Plus Hangzhou and Shanghai‘s light, refined dumplings and seafood, and the hearty quasi-Turkish kebabs and hand-pulled noodles from Xinjiang. You may want to travel for some of these dishes, but major cities will host restaurants from around the country.

2. Learn some Chinese

Chinese languages are undoubtedly intimidating, but attempting to learn a little bit of Mandarin (the most widely spoken, standardized language) will be useful. If you’re visiting for a while, consider taking a short language course.

Even quite basic Mandarin will help you get around, and people will be happy you’re making an effort. Writing down or printing out addresses in Chinese characters can make things easier.

3. Take the train

For many countries this suggestion would imply the romance of watching the countryside slide by your window. That factor still holds here,

6 cool places to visit in Mexico

1. Bahía Concepción, Baja California Sur

Mexico is blessed with an abundance of gorgeous beaches but there’s something special about the otherworldly scenery of Bahía Concepción. A pristine bay off the Sea of Cortez, halfway down the Baja California peninsular, spell-binding white-sand beaches line its shores for almost 80km (50 miles), hemmed in by forests of cacti and desert-fringed mountains. As far as kayaking goes, few places in the world can match it.

2. Real de Catorce, San Luis Potosí

Mexico’s most extraordinary “ghost town”, Real de Catorce is tucked away in a remote corner of the Bajío, a region once littered with booming silver mines. Since the mid-1990s, an influx of artists, artesanía vendors, wealthy Mexicans and a few foreigners have re-built the virtually abandoned colonial centre, with its narrow cobbled streets and elegantly faded mansions. Huichol pilgrims visit to harvest fresh peyote in the nearby desert.

3. The Copper Canyon, Chihuahua

Known for its phenomenal railway, the isolated, beautiful region dubbed the Copper Canyon is best experienced on foot. The village of Creel high in the Sierra Tarahumara acts as a base for expeditions to remote valleys, waterfalls and Rarámuri villages, while

7 famous sporting events to attend

1. The Olympic Games

Arguably the grandest of all sporting events, the Games have been held every four years (with a few notable exceptions) since 1896. Next scheduled for Tokyo in 2020, there will be a record 33 sports and 324 events. So whether you’re a die-hard fan of a particular discipline or you prefer to browse the sporting buffet, you’ll be in sports heaven. Be sure to include some time in your itinerary to discover what else Japan has to offer.

2. US Masters Tournament/British Open (Golf)

The Masters is the first of the four US Major golf tournaments to be held each year, and the only one to be held in the same location every year, namely Augusta National Golf Club in Florida. Even if you’re not a mad-keen golf fan, you’llbe wowed by the spectacularly pretty course. However, given the difficulty in actually getting your hands on a ticket to so much as a practice round, you might be better to try for the British Open, which is held at one of nine different links course in the UK each year. In 2017, the Open will be played at Royal Birkdale Golf

7 Fantastic Romantic Places

The Seychelles

With verdant rainforest stretching down to dazzling white-sand beaches and warm azure seas, it’s no surprise that the islands of the Seychelles are such an intoxicating destination. Home to a number of intimate (and often exclusive) resorts – not least on beautiful La Digue island – this is undoubtedly a honeymooner’s paradise.

Jukkasjärvi, Sweden

Constructed afresh each winter, the IceHotel is just as much an art project as it is somewhere to spend the night. Situated in Swedish Lapland, 200km north of the Arctic Circle, this is more than just an unusual place to stay (and snuggle up); it’s also an amazing spot from which to see one of the most astounding natural phenomena – the Northern Lights.

The Lake District, England

With sixteen major lakes squeezed between England’s highest mountains – and set within a mere thirty-mile area – the Lake District deserves all its hype. This is the place for long walks, picturesque villages and breathtaking scenery – and fantastic pubs in which to cosy up at the end of a day exploring.

Heidelberg, Germany

This pristine town, nestled in a wooded gorge on the River

Volcano Trekking in Panama

THE LAST HURDLE

The rain is getting worse. I’m soaking wet and can’t see anyone around me. My water and food supplies are running low and I’m starting to shiver. I’m so exhausted I can’t feel my legs, but I know I need to keep moving. How the weather could go from hot and humid to wet and cold in a matter of hours still puzzles me. The campsite where I’ll sleep tonight can’t be far now. I’m sure I’m nearly there.

FOURS DAYS TO GO

Rewind four days and here am I, on a flight to Panama with all the trekking gear you could imagine. I’m very excited and anxious – a weird, stomach-churning feeling. I’m about to climb Volcán Barú, a dormant volcano in the western Chiriquí Province; Panama’s highest point and the highest volcano in southern Central America at 3,474m (11,397ft). I’ve never done anything like it, but my biggest concern is being the only unfit person on the trip. I used to do a lot of sport when I was younger but unfortunately, over the past few years, my desk-bound job has spared me little time to keep fit.

Nevertheless,